Great Foundation Plants for Middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro TN

Great Foundation Plants for Middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro TN

Foundation plants are the inner structure of the landscape. They are like the bones of it all.   These are plants that normally create the backdrop in the landscaping. Most commonly, these plants are evergreen, and need to be very hardy to avoid loss and costly replacement. While some plants are great foundation plants for the Murfreesboro area, other plants are commonly mistaken for good foundation plants. Some plants do not tolerate our clay soils, extreme heat, humidity, drought/ rain (depends on the year), cold, or can be a nightmare to maintain. So, which plants make great foundation plants for Middle Tennessee? Here are some I do and do not recommend using: Recommended: Dwarf Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)- very tough, great for full sun Otto Luyken Laurel (Prunus laur. ‘Otto Luyken’)- needs room to spread- full sun to part shade Boxwood- (Buxus) –most are great for this application-full sun to part shade Dwarf Burford Holly- (Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii Nana’)- full sun Spreading Japanese Plum Yew- (Cephalotaxus harr. ‘Prostrata’)- needs afternoon shade Emerald Spreader Yew- (Taxus ‘Emerald Spreader’)- low growing, best with some afternoon shade Globe Arbovitae- (Thuja occidentalis ‘Little Giant’ or ‘Globosa’)- very tough, great for full sun Euonymous- (Euonymous jap. ‘Aureo- marg., Straight species, ‘Silver King’, ‘Chollipo’, ‘Aureovariegatus’, sp. Microphylla,)- most varities are tough and withstand full sun, poor soils, extreme heat. Juniper- some varieties make nice foundation plants while others will be too hard to manage in some situations. Check with your local professional. Not recommended: Compacta Holly- (Ilex crenata ‘Compacta’)- needs too much water, will not withstand extreme heat, lack of water, and is not very long...
Why You Should Not Plant a Bradford Pear Tree

Why You Should Not Plant a Bradford Pear Tree

Bradford Pear trees have long been the ‘go to’ tree for easy care and fast growth. They also bloom beautifully, grow uniformly, and display a nice fall color. “So what’s wrong with planting a Bradford Pear”, you might ask. The biggest drawback to having Bradford Pear trees, especially in our area, is their reputation for breaking during our storms, most commonly in Spring. Many cities and counties are even banning the planting of them. When there are so many other great trees you could plant, I have to ask, ‘’Why would you want to plant a Bradford Pear.’’ After reading this entry, you might ask the same question. Bradford Pear trees have a soft wood, like many other trees in their family. That is a disadvantage for them, especially since they grow and foliate so densely. Another huge disadvantage for them is the angle of the branching. The angle of the branching does not allow the Bradford Pear to grow up strong like an Oak or Maple. So besides the wood being soft, the branching is constantly testing the woods integrity. Adding insult to injury, the leaves are so dense on the Bradford Pear that they catch more of the wind, thus making them even more susceptible to breakage. For that reason, every Spring in Middle Tennessee, we get storms with strong wind and lots of people lose their Bradford Pears. There is nothing you can do but let it grow back out or cut it down. That can be time consuming, disheartening, and costly. With so many options, why would anyone even want a Bradford Pear you might...