Great Foundation Plants for Middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro TN

Great Foundation Plants for Middle Tennessee and Murfreesboro TN

Foundation plants are the inner structure of the landscape. They are like the bones of it all.   These are plants that normally create the backdrop in the landscaping. Most commonly, these plants are evergreen, and need to be very hardy to avoid loss and costly replacement. While some plants are great foundation plants for the Murfreesboro area, other plants are commonly mistaken for good foundation plants. Some plants do not tolerate our clay soils, extreme heat, humidity, drought/ rain (depends on the year), cold, or can be a nightmare to maintain. So, which plants make great foundation plants for Middle Tennessee? Here are some I do and do not recommend using: Recommended: Dwarf Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)- very tough, great for full sun Otto Luyken Laurel (Prunus laur. ‘Otto Luyken’)- needs room to spread- full sun to part shade Boxwood- (Buxus) –most are great for this application-full sun to part shade Dwarf Burford Holly- (Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii Nana’)- full sun Spreading Japanese Plum Yew- (Cephalotaxus harr. ‘Prostrata’)- needs afternoon shade Emerald Spreader Yew- (Taxus ‘Emerald Spreader’)- low growing, best with some afternoon shade Globe Arbovitae- (Thuja occidentalis ‘Little Giant’ or ‘Globosa’)- very tough, great for full sun Euonymous- (Euonymous jap. ‘Aureo- marg., Straight species, ‘Silver King’, ‘Chollipo’, ‘Aureovariegatus’, sp. Microphylla,)- most varities are tough and withstand full sun, poor soils, extreme heat. Juniper- some varieties make nice foundation plants while others will be too hard to manage in some situations. Check with your local professional. Not recommended: Compacta Holly- (Ilex crenata ‘Compacta’)- needs too much water, will not withstand extreme heat, lack of water, and is not very long...
Good Screen Plants for Middle Tennessee

Good Screen Plants for Middle Tennessee

There are a large number of plants that will work well as a screen to block an unwanted view.   A number of design methods are also employed when planting a screen as a visual block or to create interest. I will discuss some of my beliefs as a professional in the industry for more than 20 years. In planning and planting a screen, either evergreen or deciduous plants can be used. Some common evergreen plants used in our area are Leyland Cypress, Eastern Red Cedar, Green Giant Arborvitae, Emerald Arborvitae, and Cherry Laurel. Some deciduous trees are also employed such as Redbud, Cherry, Serviceberry, and Pear. Leyland cypress can make a nice screen, but are now threatened by a canker that can jeopardize the longevity of the plant, thus jeopardizing your screen. Eastern Red Cedar is a native that looks great, but can be tough to propagate and transplant. The success rate is normally low for digging these plants and trying to move them. That leads us to Green Giant Arborvitae, Emerald Arborvitae and Cherry Laurel. These three are very durable in our area. They grow relatively fast, require little water once established, and do not face many issues with diseases or pests. Granted the Arborvitae do get bagworms in the late summer, they are easy to spot and remove or treat. As for the deciduous plants, they are all fairly tough and care is easy. Some of the softer woods like pear and cherry can be prone to webworms, but once again, they are easily spotted and easily treated. The list of deciduous trees that can be used...